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image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable

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image: Microflora for Hire

Microflora for Hire

By | December 1, 2014

The guts of cows and termites harbor microbes that are renowned complex-carbohydrate digesters, but the human gastrointestinal tract has flora that just might measure up.

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image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

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image: Mosquito Genomes Galore

Mosquito Genomes Galore

By | November 27, 2014

Whole-genome sequences of 16 different mosquito species reveal rapid evolution and could inform malaria research.

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image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.

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image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

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image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.

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image: Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

Culturing Drug-Resistant Tumors

By | November 17, 2014

Improved methods to grow patients’ tumor cells in a dish offer opportunities to find durable therapies.

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image: Sealed With a Kiss

Sealed With a Kiss

By | November 17, 2014

A single intimate smooch can transfer upwards of 80 million bacteria.

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