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The football league and the government agency part ways over how the money should be used.

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A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.

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image: Image of the Day: Itty Bitty Cell Sucker

Image of the Day: Itty Bitty Cell Sucker

By | July 21, 2017

With a diameter smaller than 100 nanometers, this nanopipette’s indiscernible tip is tiny enough to suck up minute contents of a single cell. 

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image: Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

Demonstrating Discontent, May 21, 1990

By | July 17, 2017

Activists demanded greater access to and involvement in clinical research for AIDS treatments—and their protests were heard.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 17, 2017

The NIH budget, the nature of science, paternal age, and more

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Uncovering Functions of Circular RNAs

Uncovering Functions of Circular RNAs

By | July 17, 2017

Recent research has revealed many surprises about circular RNAs, from findings that they are translated in vivo to links between their expression and disease.

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image: Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

By | July 17, 2017

And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

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image: Making the Rounds

Making the Rounds

By | July 17, 2017

Circular RNA biogenesis occurs when RNA fragments are bent into closed loops of one or more exons and/or introns.

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