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image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  

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A molecule produced by a strain of Staphylococcus epidermis interferes with DNA synthesis.

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image: Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 1, 2018

After discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania’s Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | March 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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The animal pictures and hand stencils were made in caves in Spain thousands of years before Homo sapiens arrived in Europe.

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image: Image of the Day: Tardigrades!

Image of the Day: Tardigrades!

By The Scientist Staff | February 13, 2018

The microscopic water bears will be featured in an exhibition at the Harvard Museum of Natural History beginning Saturday, February 17.

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image: Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

By Abby Olena | February 2, 2018

In one of the first looks at the urinary virome, researchers find hundreds of viruses, most of which have never been sequenced before. 

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The Purdue University researcher is one of the first to examine the molecular processes that underlie infection by soil microbes.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

The new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected at sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.

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