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image: EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

By Kerry Grens | March 5, 2018

In audio files from 2005, the future Administrator of the EPA said there’s a lack of “sufficient scientific facts” to back the theory.

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image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  

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A molecule produced by a strain of Staphylococcus epidermis interferes with DNA synthesis.

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In response to short DNA fragments, lymphocytes release mitochondrial DNA that helps trigger an immune response.

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image: Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 1, 2018

After discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania’s Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.

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image: Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

By Vikramjit Lahiri and Daniel J. Klionsky | March 1, 2018

New details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.

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image: Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

Researchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.

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The elimination of the biting pests was an added bonus after researchers unleashed a rat-eradication endeavor on the tiny islands.  

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image: Image of the Day: Size Matters

Image of the Day: Size Matters

By The Scientist Staff | February 23, 2018

The male proboscis monkey’s large nose probably evolved in response to female preference and competition between males.

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image: Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

By Ashley Yeager | February 23, 2018

Dampening the immune response to stay up in the air may have helped bats become tolerant to viral infections.

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