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image: Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

By | August 9, 2011

More than 100 researchers have left a neuroscience institute in Brazil in the last couple of weeks, protesting managerial problems they say are thwarting their work.

21 Comments

image: Rats Don't Map Altitude

Rats Don't Map Altitude

By | August 8, 2011

Rat neurons only weakly respond as the animals climbed upwards, suggesting the brain's map of the environment doesn't account for altitude.

9 Comments

image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

12 Comments

image: Estrogen’s New Role

Estrogen’s New Role

By | August 2, 2011

The well-studied hormone functions as a neurotransmitter in the brains of zebra finches.

0 Comments

image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: Memory Aid

Memory Aid

By | August 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Neuroscience

3 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2011

First Life, Radioactivity, Brain Bugs, Life of Earth

0 Comments

Contributors

August 1, 2011

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2011 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age

Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age

By | July 25, 2011

Unlike human brains, chimpanzee brains don’t get smaller as they age, suggesting that pronounced neurological decline is a uniquely human byproduct of our oversized brains and extreme longevity.

33 Comments

image: Learning Addiction

Learning Addiction

By | July 13, 2011

Eleanor Simpson, a neuroscientist at Columbia University Medical Center, discusses a recent Nature paper that probes dopamine's role in helping animals make positive associations to stimuli that herald pleasurable outcomes (such as the handing out of food).

9 Comments

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