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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By The Scientist Staff | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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image: Those We Lost in 2017

Those We Lost in 2017

By Katarina Zimmer | December 27, 2017

The scientific community bid farewell to a number of luminaries this year. 

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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By Anna Azvolinsky | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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image: Passing the Torch

Passing the Torch

By Mary Beth Aberlin | December 1, 2017

Looking back, looking forward

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The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.

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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

By The Scientist Staff | November 28, 2017

Scientists study the development of scales in skate embryos. 

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By The Scientist Staff | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By The Scientist Staff | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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