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image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | October 19, 2015

Richard Heck, pioneer of a reaction that binds carbon atoms using palladium, has passed away at age 84.

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image: Taking a Dino’s Temperature

Taking a Dino’s Temperature

By | October 15, 2015

Researchers develop a method for estimating the body temperatures of long-extinct species, and suggest that dinosaurs operated somewhere between endothermy and exothermy.

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image: Dengue’s Downfall?

Dengue’s Downfall?

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers characterize a protein that could be key to the virus’s virulence—and to developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

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image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

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image: Body, Heal Thyself

Body, Heal Thyself

By | September 1, 2015

Reviving a decades-old hypothesis of autoimmunity

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Human Touch

The Human Touch

By | August 1, 2015

Can mice with humanlike tissues better model drug effects in people?

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image: The Spleen Collectors

The Spleen Collectors

By | August 1, 2015

Donated organs are helping researchers map out the immune system in humans.

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image: Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston. Age: 35

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image: NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

By | July 22, 2015

A small study links the diversity of a person’s natural killer cell repertoire to risk of HIV infection following exposure to the virus.

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