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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By Ben Andrew Henry | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

2 Comments

image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By Anna Azvolinsky | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: Image of the Day: Goodbye Colo

Image of the Day: Goodbye Colo

By The Scientist Staff | January 18, 2017

Colo, the oldest zoo gorilla and the first born in captivity, died on January 17 at age 60.

1 Comment

image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By Ashley P. Taylor | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: Image of the Day: Tied Up

Image of the Day: Tied Up

By The Scientist Staff | January 13, 2017

Scientists created the world’s tiniest molecular knot, only 192 atoms in length, using iron ions to guide the braiding process.

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image: First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

By Kerry Grens | January 11, 2017

The federal government concludes the rusty patched bumblebee is nearing extinction.

5 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

By The Scientist Staff | January 9, 2017

When road deicing salt enters freshwater ecosystems, prey species such as Daphnia pulex can rapidly evolve tolerance to the contaminant, buffering their local food webs from the impacts of salination.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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