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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Microbe Maven

Microbe Maven

By | July 17, 2017

Meet Scientist to Watch Emily Balskus, who studies the microbes that inhabit humans.

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image: Microbiota Manipulations

Microbiota Manipulations

By | July 17, 2017

Two research teams develop tools for tinkering with a bacterial genus prominent in human guts.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 

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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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image: Image of the Day: Psychedelic Symbiosis

Image of the Day: Psychedelic Symbiosis

By | July 12, 2017

Thanks to the bioluminescent bacteria inhabiting its light organ, the vividly colored southern bobtail squid (Euprymna tasmanica) can glow in the dark. 

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image: Transgenic Mouse Illuminates Melanoma Metastasis

Transgenic Mouse Illuminates Melanoma Metastasis

By | June 28, 2017

Glowing cells mark the routes of tumor spread by way of newly formed lymph vessels. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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