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» bioluminescence, disease/medicine and culture

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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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image: Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

By | July 17, 2017

And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

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image: Endocannabinoids in the Groove

Endocannabinoids in the Groove

By | July 17, 2017

The system responsible for the buzz humans get from marijuana plays a passel of physiological roles outside the brain.

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image: Image of the Day: Psychedelic Symbiosis

Image of the Day: Psychedelic Symbiosis

By | July 12, 2017

Thanks to the bioluminescent bacteria inhabiting its light organ, the vividly colored southern bobtail squid (Euprymna tasmanica) can glow in the dark. 

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image: Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

By | June 29, 2017

A small, placenta-produced peptide fixes the pregnancy-related condition in mice. 

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image: Transgenic Mouse Illuminates Melanoma Metastasis

Transgenic Mouse Illuminates Melanoma Metastasis

By | June 28, 2017

Glowing cells mark the routes of tumor spread by way of newly formed lymph vessels. 

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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