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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

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image: On Race and Medicine

On Race and Medicine

By | February 1, 2014

Until health care becomes truly personalized, race and ethnicity will continue to be important clues guiding medical treatments.

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image: Palade Particles, 1955

Palade Particles, 1955

By | February 1, 2014

Electron microscopy led to the first identification of what would later be known as ribosomes.

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image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

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image: Palade and His Particles

Palade and His Particles

By | February 1, 2014

Nobel Laureate Christian de Duve discusses the impact of George Palade’s work on ribosomes.

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image: Pain and Progress

Pain and Progress

By | February 1, 2014

Is it possible to make a nonaddictive opioid painkiller?

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image: Syphilis: Then and Now

Syphilis: Then and Now

By , , and | February 1, 2014

Researchers are zeroing in on the origin of syphilis and related diseases, which continue to plague the human population some 500 years after the first documented case.

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image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #3

The Scientist on The Pulse #3

By | January 28, 2014

Kerry Grens chats about ancient tooth decay, asthma, and fat cells.

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