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image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

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image: How Bulgy Bears Keep Diabetes at Bay

How Bulgy Bears Keep Diabetes at Bay

By | August 8, 2014

A genetic switch in hibernating bears keeps the animals from becoming insulin-resistant. 

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image: Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

Neural Stem Cells Sprout Long Axons

By | August 7, 2014

Early neurons reprogrammed from human skin cells show unprecedented axonal growth in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

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image: Pioneering Cancer Researcher Dies

Pioneering Cancer Researcher Dies

By | August 6, 2014

Emmanuel Farber, past American Association for Cancer Research president who advanced fundamental understanding of chemical carcinogenesis, has passed away at age 95.

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image: A Matter of Size

A Matter of Size

By | August 1, 2014

Erroneous characterization of nanomaterials can misinform the study of a new medicine’s safety and efficacy.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Metagenomics Mash-Up

Metagenomics Mash-Up

By | August 1, 2014

A tour of the newest software and strategies for analyzing microbial and viral communities

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image: Say

Say "Aaaah"

By | August 1, 2014

Scientists aim to remotely monitor Parkinson’s through voice recordings.

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image: Small Packages

Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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