The Scientist

» Nobel Prize, microbiology and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

0 Comments

image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

0 Comments

image: Prizes Bigger than the Nobel

Prizes Bigger than the Nobel

By | October 5, 2017

The Nobel Prize may garner the most attention, but there are other biomedical awards at least as lucrative.

0 Comments

Chemistry Nobel goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson. 

1 Comment

image: Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

By | October 2, 2017

Young talks with The Scientist about studying circadian rhythms in fruit flies, the applications of his work beyond Drosophila, and winning the prize. 

1 Comment

image: Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

By | October 2, 2017

A basic curiosity about how life works led the Brandeis University molecular biologist to discover how our bodies keep time. 

1 Comment

image: Nobel Laureate and Laser Scientist Dies

Nobel Laureate and Laser Scientist Dies

By | October 2, 2017

Nicolaas Bloembergen’s research laid the groundwork for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology.

0 Comments

image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

By | October 2, 2017

In the mantis shrimp brain, scientists uncover mushroom bodies—learning and memory structures typically found in the brains of insects. 

0 Comments

Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  2. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  3. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  4. CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials