The Scientist

» Nobel Prize and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.

0 Comments

image: Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

By | August 31, 2016

One of the pioneers in developing fluorescent proteins for biological studies was 64 years old.

1 Comment

image: Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

By | August 8, 2016

Scientists detect a colistin-resistance gene in a clinical sample.

0 Comments

image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | August 5, 2016

Chemist Ahmed Zewail, the “father of femtochemistry,” has passed away at age 70.

0 Comments

image: Fecal Transplant Pill Fails Trial

Fecal Transplant Pill Fails Trial

By | August 1, 2016

Seres Therapeutics’s microbiome-targeting therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection fails a Phase 2 clinical trial.

2 Comments

From sequencing bacteriophages to synthesizing bacterial genomes to defining a minimal genome

0 Comments

image: Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

By | August 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT. Age: 34

1 Comment

By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

0 Comments

image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.

0 Comments

image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  3. 2017 Top 10 Innovations
    Features 2017 Top 10 Innovations

    From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

  4. The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet
    Daily News The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

    Three new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.

FreeShip