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image: Amoeba Eats Cells Alive

Amoeba Eats Cells Alive

By | April 9, 2014

The intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills host cells by tearing pieces from them, which it then eats.

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image: The Right to Not Know

The Right to Not Know

By | April 2, 2014

Patients should be able to decline learning about incidental genetic findings when undergoing whole-genome screens, according to new expert recommendations.

1 Comment

image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

By | April 1, 2014

Nanotechnology-based therapeutics will revolutionize cancer treatment.

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image: Search and Destroy

Search and Destroy

By | April 1, 2014

Turning a patient’s immune cells into cancer-fighting weapons

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

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image: Overcoming Resistance

Overcoming Resistance

By | April 1, 2014

In the face of bacterial threats that can evade modern medicines, researchers are trying every trick in the book to develop new, effective antibiotics.

4 Comments

image: Virus Continues to Plague Midwest

Virus Continues to Plague Midwest

By | March 28, 2014

Researchers identify six new cases of the tick-borne Heartland virus in Missouri and Tennessee.

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image: Croatia Extends Vaccine Mandate

Croatia Extends Vaccine Mandate

By | March 27, 2014

A constitutional court upholds the requirement that Croatian children be vaccinated for hepatitis, measles, pertussis (whooping cough), diphtheria, and more.

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