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image: Prizes Bigger than the Nobel

Prizes Bigger than the Nobel

By | October 5, 2017

The Nobel Prize may garner the most attention, but there are other biomedical awards at least as lucrative.

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Chemistry Nobel goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson. 

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel Laureate

By | October 2, 2017

Young talks with The Scientist about studying circadian rhythms in fruit flies, the applications of his work beyond Drosophila, and winning the prize. 

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image: Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

By | October 2, 2017

A basic curiosity about how life works led the Brandeis University molecular biologist to discover how our bodies keep time. 

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image: Nobel Laureate and Laser Scientist Dies

Nobel Laureate and Laser Scientist Dies

By | October 2, 2017

Nicolaas Bloembergen’s research laid the groundwork for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology.

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image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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