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image: Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael Rosbash

By | October 2, 2017

A basic curiosity about how life works led the Brandeis University molecular biologist to discover how our bodies keep time. 

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image: Nobel Laureate and Laser Scientist Dies

Nobel Laureate and Laser Scientist Dies

By | October 2, 2017

Nicolaas Bloembergen’s research laid the groundwork for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology.

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image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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image: How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

By | September 21, 2017

Amphibians resist their own chemical defenses with amino acid modifications in the sequence for a target receptor.

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image: In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

By | September 20, 2017

Hundreds of samples from microbes living in the gut, skin, mouth, and vagina add to the human microbiome “fingerprint.” 

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