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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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image: Enormous University Gift Raises Questions over Donor Influence

Enormous University Gift Raises Questions over Donor Influence

By | September 26, 2017

The donation to the University of California, Irvine, is slated to fund a new college focusing on what some critics call pseudoscience and quackery.

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image: How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

By | September 21, 2017

Amphibians resist their own chemical defenses with amino acid modifications in the sequence for a target receptor.

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image: Second Chance for Lost Galapagos Tortoises?

Second Chance for Lost Galapagos Tortoises?

By | September 14, 2017

Researchers are trying to recreate an extinct species of the lumbering reptiles by breeding closely related species that contain traces of the lost lineage’s DNA.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

By | September 8, 2017

High-profile cases of poached fossils shine a light on the black market for paleontological specimens—and how scientists and governments are trying to stop it.

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image: How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

By | September 8, 2017

Epinephrine’s activation of the signaling pathway Hippo is responsible for the in vitro tumor-fighting effects of serum from women who worked out.

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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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Douglas Lowy and John Schiller, whose work led to the HPV vaccine, and Michael Hall, who discovered the TOR pathway, win this year’s prizes.

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image: Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

Fingerprints of Ongoing Human Evolution Found

By | September 5, 2017

Genetic variants in Alzheimer’s- and smoking-related genes appear to be under selection pressure, according to a study comparing the genomes of old and young participants.

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