The Scientist

» Nobel Prize, evolution and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By Menno Schilthuizen | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

0 Comments

image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By Tracy Vence | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

0 Comments

image: That Loving Feeling

That Loving Feeling

By Megan Scudellari | July 1, 2014

There are no FDA-approved drugs to treat low sexual desire in women, but not for lack of trying.

1 Comment

image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By Nicholette Zeliadt | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

0 Comments

image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By Megan Scudellari | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

image: Running Mice Regain Vision

Running Mice Regain Vision

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | June 27, 2014

Exposure to visual stimuli while running restores vision to mice blind in one eye. 

0 Comments

The British public votes to make creating a better test for bacterial infections the goal of the UK government’s Longitude Prize.

1 Comment

image: Omnivore Ancestors?

Omnivore Ancestors?

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | June 26, 2014

Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.

0 Comments

image: Speeding Up Antiviral T Cell Production

Speeding Up Antiviral T Cell Production

By Ruth Williams | June 25, 2014

Scientists come up with a simpler, more efficient strategy for making multivirus-targeting T cells for immunotherapy.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer
  2. Love in the Scientific Literature
    News Analysis Love in the Scientific Literature

    There are countless ways for scientists to say, “I love you.” Naming a slime-mold beetle after your wife (and another after your ex-wife) is, apparently, one of them.  

  3. DNA Robots Target Cancer
    Daily News DNA Robots Target Cancer

    Researchers use DNA origami to generate tiny mechanical devices that deliver a drug that cuts off the blood supply to tumors in mice.

  4. CDC: Flu Vaccine 36 Percent Effective So Far
AAAS