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image: CRISPR Trial for Cancer Patients Proposed

CRISPR Trial for Cancer Patients Proposed

By Katarina Zimmer | January 19, 2018

US researchers could become the first outside China to use the gene-editing technique in the clinic. 

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image: California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

By Catherine Offord | January 15, 2018

Researchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state’s 50,000 or so marijuana farms.

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The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.

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image: Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

By Ruth Williams | January 10, 2018

The near-complete feminization of northern Great Barrier Reef sea turtles has been blamed on climate change.

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image: Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

By Catherine Offord | January 5, 2018

Signaling pathways triggered by the mother’s immune system may cause complications during fetal development.

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image: The New Species of 2017

The New Species of 2017

By Jef Akst | December 27, 2017

A sampling of some of the fascinating critters identified by scientists this year

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image: Photos of the Year

Photos of the Year

By Katarina Zimmer | December 25, 2017

From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By Lucas Laursen | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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A single receptor on natural killer cells recognizes an amino acid sequence conserved across Zika, dengue, and related pathogens.

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The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

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