The Scientist

» new species, evolution, ecology and microbiology

Most Recent

image: How skunks got their stripes

How skunks got their stripes

By Megan Scudellari | June 7, 2011

The evolution of bold warning coloration in mammals.


image: A new cow-borne superbug

A new cow-borne superbug

By Bob Grant | June 7, 2011

As Germany grapples with an E. coli outbreak, a new strain of MRSA appears in Europe.


image: All aboard the Fukushima cruise

All aboard the Fukushima cruise

By Cristina Luiggi | June 6, 2011

Scientists take to the seas to study the effects of Fukushima radiation on local marine life.


image: Controversial climate study retracted

Controversial climate study retracted

By Megan Scudellari | June 6, 2011

A controversial 2008 climate study is retracted due to plagiarism.


In Chapter 9, "We Were Hunted, Which is Why All of Us are Afraid Some of the Time and Some of Us are Afraid All of the Time," author Rob Dunn explains how predators shaped our evolution as we cowered and ran from their ravenous maws.


image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By Cristina Luiggi | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 


image: Italian scientists on shaky ground

Italian scientists on shaky ground

By Cristina Luiggi | June 3, 2011

Italian seismologists are accused of manslaughter after failing to predict an earthquake that killed 309 people near the Italian city of L'Aquila.


image: Arsenic-based life debate continues

Arsenic-based life debate continues

By Jessica P. Johnson | June 2, 2011

More than a dozen researchers voice their concerns about a 2010 paper that claims bacteria can use arsenic in place of phosphorus in its DNA and other biomolecules, such as proteins.


image: Biodegradables not environmentally friendly

Biodegradables not environmentally friendly

By Cristina Luiggi | June 2, 2011

The breakdown of landfill trash by microorganisms may cause significant harm to the environment through the release of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, researchers at North Carolina State University claim.


image: The Gravity of Life

The Gravity of Life

By Rob Dunn | June 1, 2011

Whose well-being is threatened by our changing relationship with the myriad organisms that shaped the evolution of our species?


Popular Now

  1. Could Rapamycin Help Humans Live Longer?
  2. Elena Rybak-Akimova, Chemical Kinetics Expert, Dies
  3. University of Oregon Erecting a $1-Billion Science Center
  4. <em>Homo Sapiens</em> Interbred With Denisovans From Two Different Populations