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The Scientist

» new species, evolution, ecology and microbiology

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A molecule produced by a strain of Staphylococcus epidermis interferes with DNA synthesis.

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image: Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David Roos

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 1, 2018

After discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania’s Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.

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image: Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

Researchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.

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The elimination of the biting pests was an added bonus after researchers unleashed a rat-eradication endeavor on the tiny islands.  

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image: Image of the Day: Size Matters

Image of the Day: Size Matters

By The Scientist Staff | February 23, 2018

The male proboscis monkey’s large nose probably evolved in response to female preference and competition between males.

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image: Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

Bats May Have Taken on Viruses To Stay in Flight

By Ashley Yeager | February 23, 2018

Dampening the immune response to stay up in the air may have helped bats become tolerant to viral infections.

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A closer moon and ideal coastal conditions for tide pool formation may have started the evolutionary transition of tetrapods.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: Image of the Day: Tardigrades!

Image of the Day: Tardigrades!

By The Scientist Staff | February 13, 2018

The microscopic water bears will be featured in an exhibition at the Harvard Museum of Natural History beginning Saturday, February 17.

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image: Spiders with Long Tails Found in Ancient Amber

Spiders with Long Tails Found in Ancient Amber

By Jim Daley | February 5, 2018

This discovery closes a 170-million-year gap in the fossil record.

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