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image: Vlad Denic on Exploring New Fields and Failing Successfully

Vlad Denic on Exploring New Fields and Failing Successfully

By | December 1, 2016

The Harvard professor is pursuing fundamental questions about autophagy, protein homeostasis, and other cellular processes, and he’s always on the lookout for his next new topic.

2 Comments

image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

26 Comments

image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Study: Human Life Span Maxed Out

Study: Human Life Span Maxed Out

By | October 6, 2016

Scientists argue that current medical advances cannot crack Homo sapiens’s natural age limit.

1 Comment

image: Evidence Lacking for Brain-Training Products

Evidence Lacking for Brain-Training Products

By | October 4, 2016

A literature review finds little evidence that commercial brain-training games can improve everyday cognitive performance, citing methodological shortcomings.

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image: Early-Life Stress Affects Telomeres Later

Early-Life Stress Affects Telomeres Later

By | October 3, 2016

An accumulation of stressful events in childhood is associated with shorter telomeres as a person ages, researchers report. 

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image: Church on the Late Show

Church on the Late Show

By | October 1, 2016

Harvard biologist George Church talks gene therapy, aging, and reviving the woolly mammoth with Stephen Colbert.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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