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Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fearless about Folding

Fearless about Folding

By | January 1, 2016

Susan Lindquist has never shied away from letting her curiosity guide her research career.

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image: Flavor Savors

Flavor Savors

By | January 1, 2016

Odors experienced via the mouth are essential to our sense of taste.

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image: Inventing Teamwork

Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?

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image: Logically Illogical

Logically Illogical

By | January 1, 2016

The most bizarre behaviors often make perfect sense in the minds of the mentally ill.

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image: Master Folder

Master Folder

By | January 1, 2016

Meet Susan Lindquist, the MIT biologist who has won numerous accolades for her research on protein folding.

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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Smooth Move

By | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

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