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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: Project Seeks to Improve Image of Animal Research

Project Seeks to Improve Image of Animal Research

By | September 11, 2016

A new initiative in Germany aims to increase the public’s comfort with animal-based science; US government holds workshop on nonhuman primate research.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | August 1, 2016

Idiot Brain, Wild Sex, Why Diets Make Us Fat, and The Ethics of Invention

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image: Considering Gene Editing

Considering Gene Editing

By | July 12, 2016

An international committee continues its investigation into the ethical and social considerations of precision DNA editing technology with a public meeting held this morning in Washington, DC.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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