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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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image: Alzheimer’s in the Blood

Alzheimer’s in the Blood

By | July 23, 2014

Researchers are on a mission to identify blood-borne biomarkers for dementia. Will this year’s high-profile successes pave the way?

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image: Week in Review: July 14–18

Week in Review: July 14–18

By | July 18, 2014

Converting heart muscle to pacemaker cells in pigs; alternative splicing and the human proteome; questioning a reported yogurt mold-illness link; H. pylori swiftly find mouse stomach injuries

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image: Eyes, Nose as Windows to Alzheimer’s

Eyes, Nose as Windows to Alzheimer’s

By | July 14, 2014

Failing a sniff test or screening positive on an eye exam may predict people’s chances of developing the neurodegenerative disorder.

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image: A Multi-Cancer Diagnostic?

A Multi-Cancer Diagnostic?

By | July 14, 2014

Researchers report an ability to detect several types of cancer in blood samples based on signatures of immune response, but some are skeptical about the utility of such a test.

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image: Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

By | July 10, 2014

Olfactory receptors in the skin may help repair damaged tissue, a study shows.

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image: Another Alzheimer’s Blood Test?

Another Alzheimer’s Blood Test?

By | July 9, 2014

Researchers identify a set of proteins that can predict the development of Alzheimer’s disease-related dementia with 87 percent accuracy.

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image: Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

By | July 3, 2014

Scientists show how cell stress both prevents and promotes cell suicide in a study that’s equally divisive.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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The British public votes to make creating a better test for bacterial infections the goal of the UK government’s Longitude Prize.

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