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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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image: Contributors


By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.


Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.


image: Mapping Brain Proteins

Mapping Brain Proteins

By Devika G. Bansal | February 1, 2018

Researchers are using souped-up mass spectrometry to localize proteins within brain cells.


image: Virtual Reality May Revolutionize Brain Science

Virtual Reality May Revolutionize Brain Science

By Ashley Yeager | February 1, 2018

New technology could open doors for researchers studying animals’ most complex organ.


image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.


image: “Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

“Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

By Jessica Wright | January 29, 2018

After years of obscurity, strains of mice with mutations in particular genes are thrust to the fore of autism research.


image: Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

By The Scientist Staff | January 24, 2018

Insect wings may have evolved from multiple origins, say researchers.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.


image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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