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image: Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

By Mark R. Hutchinson | January 1, 2018

Immune-like cells in the central nervous system are now recognized as key participants in the creation and maintenance of persistent pain.

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image: Infographic: A Painful Pathway

Infographic: A Painful Pathway

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.

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image: Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

By Mark R. Hutchinson | January 1, 2018

The acute pain that results from injury or disease is very different from chronic pain.

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image: Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.

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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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image: Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

By The Scientist Staff | December 18, 2017

Entomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years. 

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Image of the Day: Actin Burst

Image of the Day: Actin Burst

By The Scientist Staff | December 6, 2017

Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By Kerry Grens | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

By The Scientist Staff | December 4, 2017

Factors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation. 

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