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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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image: Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

By | October 16, 2017

In mice, the tumor cells are able to thwart the immune response that would kill them—but immunotherapy prevented the return of melanoma.

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

By | October 11, 2017

Loss of the CLOCK protein, which researchers find is decreased in pediatric epilepsy patients, makes mice more prone to seizures during sleep.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

By | October 2, 2017

In the mantis shrimp brain, scientists uncover mushroom bodies—learning and memory structures typically found in the brains of insects. 

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Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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