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Spoiler Alert

By Wudan Yan | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

1 Comment

image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By Kerry Grens | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

3 Comments

image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By Amanda B. Keener | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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image: Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?

By Bob Grant | February 24, 2016

Compounds typically used to calm the immune system can prevent death from scorpion venom in mice, researchers report.

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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By Ashley P. Taylor | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By Anna Azvolinsky | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By Jef Akst | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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Contributors

By Karen Zusi | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By Karen Zusi | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

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