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image: Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

By | August 1, 2013

Crescent, An Empty Land of Plenty, Prophet of Bones, and Equilateral

1 Comment

image: Intelligent Life: The Search Continues

Intelligent Life: The Search Continues

By | August 1, 2013

Humans continue to scan the cosmos for a familiar brand of intelligence while ignoring a deeper form that pulses here at home.

9 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2013

August 2013's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: A Fly on the Wall

A Fly on the Wall

By | July 19, 2013

A geneticist-turned-filmmaker is making a movie set in Columbia University’s famous Fly Room, where the foundations for modern genetics were laid.

0 Comments

image: Gene Therapy Coming of Age?

Gene Therapy Coming of Age?

By | July 11, 2013

Using lentiviral vectors to replace mutated genes in blood stem cells, scientists successfully treat two rare diseases apparently without causing harmful side effects.

2 Comments

In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

1 Comment

image: The Art of Science

The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Going International

Opinion: Going International

By and | June 10, 2013

US universities need to reach across their own borders to retain global scientific preeminence.

0 Comments

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