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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Is Bilingualism Good for Kids?

Is Bilingualism Good for Kids?

By | July 1, 2016

New research suggests that raising kids in a dual-language environment might be better for their verbal development than previously realized.  

2 Comments

image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

1 Comment

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Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

1 Comment

Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Wondrous Truths</em>

Book Excerpt from Wondrous Truths

By | June 1, 2016

In Chapter 2 author J.D. Trout highlights the dividing line between truth and scientific “fact.”

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | June 1, 2016

14-day-old embryos, prioritizing biodiversity, and more

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Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

6 Comments

image: Zika Causes Microcephaly in Mice

Zika Causes Microcephaly in Mice

By | May 11, 2016

Three studies show that the virus can cause birth defects in mouse embryos.

1 Comment

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