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image: First Genetic Screen of Pigs Using ENU

First Genetic Screen of Pigs Using ENU

By Ashley Yeager | July 14, 2017

Using the mutagenic chemical N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, researchers confirm the role of a gene in a piglet deformity and identify potential models for human diseases. 


image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By Ashley Yeager | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.


Genomic analysis of an oak tree that lived during Napoleon’s time supports the idea that plants somehow avoid the accumulation of mutations in their stem cells.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.


image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By Abby Olena | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.


The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By Robert Sapolsky | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.


The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By Rachel Berkowitz | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF


image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By Andrea Anderson | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.


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