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image: Image of the Day: Plastic Feast

Image of the Day: Plastic Feast

By | October 30, 2017

New research suggests that plastic might just “taste good” to hard corals.

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image: Opinion: Toxic Time Bombs

Opinion: Toxic Time Bombs

By | September 25, 2017

Decades of evidence point to the untoward health effects of endocrine disruptor exposures, yet little is being done to regulate the chemicals.

2 Comments

image: Plastic Munching Plankton

Plastic Munching Plankton

By | August 16, 2017

This giant larvacean can ingest microplastic pollution and poop it down to the sea floor.

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Researchers show that pinkie-size marine organisms can ingest and poop out microplastics, potentially transporting them to the depths.

2 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Infographic: Plastic Pollution

Infographic: Plastic Pollution

By | June 1, 2017

Both macroplastic items, such as bags, bottles, and other packaging, and products containing micro- and nanoplastic particles—from cosmetics to paints—contaminate the Earth’s ecosystems.

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image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

By | June 1, 2017

Contamination of marine and terrestrial ecosystems by microplastics is putting individual organisms at risk.

2 Comments

image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Effects of BPA Substitutes

Effects of BPA Substitutes

By | April 11, 2016

Two studies add to the evidence that replacements for the plastic additive affect cells and animals in the same, untoward ways as bisphenol A.

4 Comments

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