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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

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image: Scientists’ Expectations for Brexit Mostly Grim

Scientists’ Expectations for Brexit Mostly Grim

By | September 12, 2017

Some researchers have already been negatively affected by the U.K.’s decision to leave the European Union, though opinions on the eventual outcome remain mixed.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: U.K. Lays Out Its Vision for Post-Brexit Research

U.K. Lays Out Its Vision for Post-Brexit Research

By | September 7, 2017

The government’s new position paper on science and innovation after leaving the E.U. takes a positive tone, but has frustrated researchers with its lack of detail.

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image: UK’s Brexit Team Lacks a Science Advisor

UK’s Brexit Team Lacks a Science Advisor

By | July 18, 2017

Advocacy groups call for the role to be filled.

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The proposed criteria for seeking out the chemicals were criticized by a number of groups, including scientific societies and environmental advocates.

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The European Union’s highest court issued a ruling yesterday that allows plaintiffs to sue vaccine makers without providing scientific evidence of harm.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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