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image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.


image: Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

By Ruth Williams | November 1, 2017

Newly designed sensors detect the magnetic fields generated by electrical activity within cat brains.


image: Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

Recent advances in single-cell omics and other techniques are revealing variation at genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptomic levels.


image: Kyle Smith Shines a Light on Addiction

Kyle Smith Shines a Light on Addiction

By Shawna Williams | November 1, 2017

The Dartmouth College professor uses optogenetics to probe the neurological routes of habitual behavior.


image: Lessons in Memory from a Champ

Lessons in Memory from a Champ

By Jef Akst | November 1, 2017

A four-time winner of the USA Memory Championship is helping scientists understand how the brain works.

1 Comment

image: Lighting Up Monkey Brains

Lighting Up Monkey Brains

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | November 1, 2017

Optogenetic and chemogenetic tools illuminate brain and behavior connections in nonhuman primates.


image: Memory Master

Memory Master

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Four-time USA Memory Champion Nelson Dellis reveals some of his memory-training tactics.


image: The Benefits of Trepidation

The Benefits of Trepidation

By Abigail Marsh | November 1, 2017

While wiping fear from our brains may seem attractive, the emotion is an essential part of our behavioral repertoire.

1 Comment

image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By Philip Jaekl | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.


image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By Mary Beth Aberlin | November 1, 2017

Every human brain is far more unique, adaptable, and vulnerable than ever suspected.

1 Comment

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