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image: For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

By | July 1, 2011

Eleanor Simpson on how dopamine helps rats learn and may lead humans to addiction.

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image: Best in Academia, 2011

Best in Academia, 2011

By | July 1, 2011

Meet some of the finalists of this year's Best Places to Work in Academia survey. 

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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

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image: Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

By | July 1, 2011

This animation illustrates optogenetics—a radical new technology for controlling brain activity with light. 

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image: Probiotic Protection

Probiotic Protection

By | July 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in microbiology

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 28, 2011

Meet the species whose DNA has recently been sequenced.

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image: Deadly Trait Combo Arms German <em>E. coli</em>

Deadly Trait Combo Arms German E. coli

By | June 27, 2011

The virulent strain that has killed 48 people produces Shiga toxin and sticks to the intestinal wall.

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image: One Bad Apple

One Bad Apple

By | June 24, 2011

A unique virus and the worm it infects turn up in an orchard outside of Paris.

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image: Sleep on it

Sleep on it

By | June 23, 2011

Scientists invent a method to control the timing and duration of sleep in fruit flies and find that snoozing helps form long-term memories.

9 Comments

image: Summit Science

Summit Science

By | June 20, 2011

Researchers seeking a link between vision problems and the dangerous physiological effects of hypoxia in mountain climbers are taking their work to new heights.

6 Comments

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