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Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.

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image: Bees Under Attack

Bees Under Attack

By The Scientist Staff | January 31, 2018

Japanese honeybees (Apis cerana japonica) respond to an attack by a Vespa mandarinia wasp.

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image: “Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

“Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

By Jessica Wright | January 29, 2018

After years of obscurity, strains of mice with mutations in particular genes are thrust to the fore of autism research.

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image: Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

By The Scientist Staff | January 29, 2018

Mitochondria may sustain temperatures more than 10 °C warmer than human cells, say researchers. 

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The findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.

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image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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In mice and flies, the Arc protein forms capsids and carries genetic information.

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Researchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.

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image: Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

By Abby Olena | January 8, 2018

Three studies—one of mice and two of human genetics—describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes. 

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