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image: <em>TS</em> Picks: May 7, 2015

TS Picks: May 7, 2015

By | May 7, 2015

Genetics & genomics edition

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

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image: Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

By | May 1, 2015

A close cooperation between science, politics, and economics has helped to control one of history’s most destructive epidemics.  

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2015

May 2015's selection of notable quotes

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