The Scientist

» immunology, disease/medicine and evolution

Most Recent

image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

0 Comments

image: Accidental Orgasms

Accidental Orgasms

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the researcher struggling to gain approval for his medical device, which was originally designed to relieve back pain, but turned out to be an orgasm inducer.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2014

Sex on Earth, Wild Connection, The Classification of Sex, and XL Love

0 Comments

image: Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

2 Comments

image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

0 Comments

image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

0 Comments

image: That Loving Feeling

That Loving Feeling

By | July 1, 2014

There are no FDA-approved drugs to treat low sexual desire in women, but not for lack of trying.

1 Comment

image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

0 Comments

image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy
  2. Long-term Study Finds That the Pesticide Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer
  3. Researchers Build a Cancer Immunotherapy Without Immune Cells
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech