The Scientist

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image: Widespread Plant Immune Tactics

Widespread Plant Immune Tactics

By | February 22, 2016

A survey of plant genomes reveals how different species trick pathogens into triggering their immune defenses.

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image: New CRISPR Patent Issued

New CRISPR Patent Issued

By | February 18, 2016

Caribou Biosciences receives a patent related to the gene-editing technology.

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image: Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

By | February 11, 2016

Ancient DNA in the genomes of modern humans influences a range of physiological traits.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Another Lyme Disease–Causing Bacterium Found

Another Lyme Disease–Causing Bacterium Found

By | February 9, 2016

Scientists discover another species of Borrelia in the U.S.

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Chat With Charlie

Chat With Charlie

By | February 1, 2016

See a preview of the app that lets you ask questions of a virtual Charles Darwin.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fighting Back

Fighting Back

By | February 1, 2016

Plants can’t run away from attackers, so they’ve evolved unique immune defenses to protect themselves.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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