The Scientist

» mite and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Opinion: Share Your Data

Opinion: Share Your Data

By Michael P. Milham, Arno Klein, and Cameron Craddock | October 24, 2017

Our analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.

2 Comments

image: Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

By Ruth Williams | October 18, 2017

People who read normally tend to have one dominant eye while people with dyslexia do not, research shows.

4 Comments

image: Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

By Diana Kwon | October 11, 2017

Loss of the CLOCK protein, which researchers find is decreased in pediatric epilepsy patients, makes mice more prone to seizures during sleep.

0 Comments

image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By Catherine Offord | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

By The Scientist Staff | October 2, 2017

In the mantis shrimp brain, scientists uncover mushroom bodies—learning and memory structures typically found in the brains of insects. 

0 Comments

Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By Aggie Mika | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

The 38-year-old synthetic biologist comes from a long line of tinkerers and engineers.

0 Comments

image: Introducing Batman

Introducing Batman

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2017

Daniel Kish, who is blind, uses vocal clicks to navigate the world by echolocation.

0 Comments

image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By Shawna Williams | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  3. Sweden Cancels Agreement With Elsevier Over Open Access
  4. Prevalent Form of Childhood Leukemia May Be Preventable