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image: Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

By | January 1, 2018

If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.

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image: Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

By | January 1, 2018

Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.

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image: Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

By | January 1, 2018

Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.

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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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image: Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

By | December 1, 2017

Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.

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The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researcher’s work will help predict how the Arctic is responding to climate change—and the global effects of those changes.

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image: Passing the Torch

Passing the Torch

By | December 1, 2017

Looking back, looking forward

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