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image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2018

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

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image: Infographic: A Painful Pathway

Infographic: A Painful Pathway

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.

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image: Prospecting for Painkillers

Prospecting for Painkillers

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2018

Cone snail venom researcher Mandë Holford discusses the therapeutic potential of toxins found in animals.

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image: Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.

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image: Animal Analgesics

Animal Analgesics

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2018

A cornucopia of toxins in the animal kingdom could provide inspiration for novel painkillers, but so far, effective drugs have proven elusive.  

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image: Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

By Shawna Williams | January 1, 2018

Decades after their discovery by bioprospectors, amphibian-derived analgesics continue to attract scientific attention.

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image: Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Arachnids harbor a plentiful array of molecules that target mammalian pain receptors.

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image: Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

By Bob Grant | January 1, 2018

Studying cone snail venom has yielded novel pain pathways, but the peptides that function as toxins are difficult to translate into drugs.

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image: Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.

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image: Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2018

If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.

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