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image: Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Arachnids harbor a plentiful array of molecules that target mammalian pain receptors.

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image: Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

By Bob Grant | January 1, 2018

Studying cone snail venom has yielded novel pain pathways, but the peptides that function as toxins are difficult to translate into drugs.

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image: Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.

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image: Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2018

If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.

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image: Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

By Abby Olena | January 1, 2018

Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.

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image: Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

By Kerry Grens | January 1, 2018

Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.

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image: Image of the Day: Actin Burst

Image of the Day: Actin Burst

By The Scientist Staff | December 6, 2017

Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By Lucas Laursen | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By Anna Azvolinsky | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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A single receptor on natural killer cells recognizes an amino acid sequence conserved across Zika, dengue, and related pathogens.

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