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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By Kate Yandell | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By Kate Yandell | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.


image: Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | May 24, 2014

Gerald Edelman, who broke new ground in two distinct fields of life science, has passed away at age 84.


image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.


image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By Jef Akst | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By Jamie Green and Charlotte Ariyan | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer


image: Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 19, 2014

Exposure to vitamin A in the womb influences immune system development and lifelong ability to fight infections, a mouse study shows. 

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By Tracy Vence | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch


image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By Laasya Samhita | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.


image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By Ed Yong | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.


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