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image: Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready

By | January 1, 2018

Decades after their discovery by bioprospectors, amphibian-derived analgesics continue to attract scientific attention.

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image: Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues

By | January 1, 2018

Arachnids harbor a plentiful array of molecules that target mammalian pain receptors.

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image: Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace

By | January 1, 2018

Studying cone snail venom has yielded novel pain pathways, but the peptides that function as toxins are difficult to translate into drugs.

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image: Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics

By | January 1, 2018

Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.

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image: Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity

By | January 1, 2018

If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.

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image: Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings

By | January 1, 2018

Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.

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image: Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain

By | January 1, 2018

Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.

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image: Urine Test for TB Yields Results in 12 Hours

Urine Test for TB Yields Results in 12 Hours

By | December 14, 2017

The new test could improve upon two current methods to diagnose tuberculosis—a skin test or culturing bacteria from saliva, both of which take days.

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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