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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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image: Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

By The Scientist Staff | December 18, 2017

Entomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years. 

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image: Image of the Day: Plant Bulbs 

Image of the Day: Plant Bulbs 

By The Scientist Staff | December 14, 2017

Scientists infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies. 

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By Kerry Grens | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By Lucas Laursen | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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image: Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

By The Scientist Staff | December 4, 2017

Factors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation. 

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Among this year’s winners are a geneticist who revealed how plants respond to shade and a group of physicists who mapped the universe’s background radiation.

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image: Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

By Ignacio Amigo | December 1, 2017

Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.

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A single receptor on natural killer cells recognizes an amino acid sequence conserved across Zika, dengue, and related pathogens.

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