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image: Science History: The First Transgenic <em>Arabidopsis</em>

Science History: The First Transgenic Arabidopsis

By | October 1, 2016

Tweaks to a transformation protocol in 1986 cemented the little plant's mighty role in plant genetics research.

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image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: The Flower Sense of Hawkmoths

The Flower Sense of Hawkmoths

By | September 1, 2016

The pollinators of a wild tobacco plant use the tip of their proboscis to determine whether they should stop for a drink.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

Bumblebees Pick Infected Tomato Plants

By | August 11, 2016

Tomatoes infected with cucumber mosaic virus lure the pollinators, according to a study.

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A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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image: Evidence of Risk Assessment in Plants Reported

Evidence of Risk Assessment in Plants Reported

By | June 30, 2016

Pea plants seem to assess risks related to nutrient access and direct their roots accordingly.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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