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image: Skin Microbes Help Clear Infection

Skin Microbes Help Clear Infection

By | September 16, 2015

In a small study, researchers find a link between an individual’s skin microbiome and the ability to clear a bacterial infection. 

1 Comment

image: Traditional Medicine for Leishmaniasis

Traditional Medicine for Leishmaniasis

By | September 14, 2015

A plant used in traditional Mayan remedies to cure the parasitic infection produces a potent compound.

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image: Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

Another Ancient Giant Virus Discovered

By | September 14, 2015

From the same Siberian permafrost where three others were previously discovered, scientists find a fourth type of giant virus.

2 Comments

image: Tide Shifting on Embryo Gene Editing?

Tide Shifting on Embryo Gene Editing?

By | September 11, 2015

An international bioethics group says that research that involves editing genes in human embryos can be valuable, though it doesn’t approve of making “designer babies.”

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image: Telltale Mouth Microbes

Telltale Mouth Microbes

By | September 9, 2015

The composition of the plaque microbiome can reveal a child’s risk of dental caries months before the decay appears, according to a study.

1 Comment

image: Adapting to Elevated CO<sub>2</sub>

Adapting to Elevated CO2

By | September 1, 2015

High carbon dioxide levels can irreversibly rev up a cyanobacterium’s ability to fix nitrogen over the long term, a study finds.

2 Comments

image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.

5 Comments

image: Censored Professor Quits

Censored Professor Quits

By | August 27, 2015

Alice Dreger is resigning from the faculty of Northwestern University, claiming that the administration censored her work in a faculty journal.

3 Comments

image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.

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image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 

2 Comments

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